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History Through A Looking Glass

South Carolina Standards

Revolutionary War Program

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General Andrew Pickens

General Andrew Pickens was an inigma in the truest sense of the word.  Born out of the turmoil of the American Revolution, he was known to the Cherokee as "Skyagunsta" or the "Wizard Owl".  This once consumate Indian fighter would become a successful Indian trader and planter along the South Carolina back country in the mid-18th Century.

 

At the very outset of the Revolution, he would align himself firmly on the side of the Patriots when he took part in the first land battle south of New England at Ninety-Six, in November 1775.  When the British took Charleston, in May 1780, Pickens, now Colonel of a back country militia regiment, became known to Lord Cornwallis, the British commander, as "the most dangerous man in South Carolina".  Known to his fellow Patriots as "the Hero of Kettle Creek", he was instrumental in the defeats of the British at Augusta, Cowpens, Guilford Courthouse, and assisting General Green at the Seige of Ninety-Six, as well as many other skirmishes in the back country.

 

A defender of "Liberty" to both Georgia and South Carolina, Andrew Pickens was a true "Firebrand of the American Revolution".  Hear his story in his own words from letters, diaries, and documents of the time period.  A display of artifacts and items from the colonial period accompanies this program.

 
GRADE 3
South Carolina Studies 

 
Standard 3-3 The student will demonstrate an understanding of the American Revolution and South Carolina’s role in the development of the new American nation.  
 
People establish governments to provide stability and ensure the protection of their rights as citizens. To understand the causes and results of the American Revolution on South Carolina, the student will utilize the knowledge and skills set forth in the following indicators: 
 
3-3.1 Summarize the causes of the American Revolution, including Britain’s passage of the Stamp Act, the Tea Act, and the Intolerable Acts; the rebellion of the colonists; and the writing of the Declaration of Independence.
 
3-3.2 Compare the perspectives of South Carolinians during the American Revolution, including Patriots, Loyalists, women, enslaved and free Africans, and Native Americans.
 
3-3.3 Summarize the course of the American Revolution in South Carolina, including the role of William Jasper and Fort Moultrie; the occupation of Charles Town by the British; the partisan warfare of Thomas Sumter, Andrew Pickens, and Francis Marion; and the battles of Cowpens, Kings Mountain, and Eutaw Springs.
 
3-3.4 Summarize the effects of the American Revolution, including the establishment of state and national governments. 
 
 
 
GRADE 4
United States Studies to 1865
 
Standard 4-2: The student will demonstrate an understanding of how the settlement of North America was influenced by the interactions of Native Americans, Europeans, and Africans. 
 
The interaction among peoples from three different continents created a distinctly American culture. To understand the contributions made by Native Americans, Europeans, and Africans to the settlement of North America, the student will utilize the knowledge and skills set forth in the following indicators:
  
4-2.4 Summarize the relationships among the Native Americans, Europeans, and Africans, including the French and Indian Wars, the slave revolts, and the conduct of trade.
 
Standard 4-3: The student will demonstrate an understanding of the conflict between the American colonies and England.  
 
Revolutions result from resistance to conditions that are perceived as unfair by the people who are demanding change. The changes brought about by revolution can be both positive and negative. To understand the results of the conflict between the American colonies and England, the student will utilize the knowledge and skills set forth in the following indicators: 
 
4-3.1 Explain the major political and economic factors leading to the American Revolution, including the French and Indian War, the Stamp Act, the Tea Act, and the Intolerable Acts as well as American resistance to these acts through boycotts, petitions, and congresses. 
 
4-3.2 Explain the significance of major ideas and philosophies of government reflected in the Declaration of Independence. 
 
4-3.3 Summarize the importance of the key battles of the Revolutionary War and the reasons for American victories including Lexington and Concord, Bunker (Breed’s) Hill, Charleston, Saratoga, Cowpens, and Yorktown.
 
4-3.4 Explain how the American Revolution affected attitudes toward and the future of slavery, women, and Native Americans.  
 
Standard 4-4: The student will demonstrate an understanding of the beginnings of America as a nation and the establishment of the new government. 

After independence was declared, Americans were faced with creating a new form of government that would embody the ideals for which they had fought. To understand the development of these United States into a new nation, the student will utilize the knowledge and skills set forth in the following indicators:
 
Indicators 4-4.1 Compare the ideas in the Articles of Confederation with those in the United States Constitution, including how powers are now shared between state and national government and how individuals and states are represented in Congress.
 
 
GRADE 8 
South Carolina: One of the United States

 
Standard 8-2: The student will demonstrate an understanding of the causes of the American Revolution and the beginnings of the new nation, with an emphasis on South Carolina’s role in the development of that nation.  
 
The events surrounding the American Revolution transformed British colonists into American citizens. To understand South Carolina’s pivotal role in this process, the student will utilize the knowledge and skills set forth in the following indicators: 
 
8-2.1 Explain the political and economic consequences of the French and Indian War on the relationship of the South Carolina colonists with Native Americans and England.
 
8-2.2 Summarize the response of South Carolina to events leading to the American Revolution, including the Stamp Act, the Tea Acts, and the Sons of Liberty.
 
8-2.3 Explain the roles of South Carolinians in the adoption of the Declaration of Independence.
 
8-2.4 Compare the perspectives of different groups of South Carolinians during the American Revolution, including Patriots, Tories/Loyalists, women, enslaved and free Africans, and Native Americans. 
 
8-2.5 Summarize the role of South Carolinians in the course of the American Revolution, including the use of partisan warfare and the battles of Charleston, Camden, Cowpens,  Kings Mountain and Eutaw Springs. 
 
8-2.6 Explain the role of South Carolinians in the establishment of their new state government and the national government after the American Revolution.

  
 
High School
United States History and the Constitution
 
Standard USHC-1: The student will demonstrate an understanding of the conflicts between regional and national interest in the development of democracy in the United States. 
 
Contemporary democratic ideals originated in England, were transplanted to North America by English settlers, and have evolved in the United States as a result of regional experiences. To understand this evolution of democracy and the conflict between local and national interests, the student will utilize the knowledge and skills set forth in the following indicators:
 

USHC-1.1  Summarize the distinct characteristics of each colonial region in the settlement and development of British North America, including religious, social, political, and economic differences. 
 
USHC-1.2 Analyze the early development of representative government and political rights in the American colonies, including the influence of the British political system and the rule of law as written in the Magna Carta and the English Bill of Rights, and the conflict between the colonial legislatures and the British Parliament over the right to tax that resulted in the American Revolutionary War.
 
USHC-1.3 Analyze the impact of the Declaration of Independence and the American Revolution on establishing the ideals of a democratic republic.