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History Through A Looking Glass

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The "Early Explorer's" Program can either be taught by a Early Colonist or an Indian Trader.

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GRADE 3
South Carolina Studies
 
Standard 3-2: The student will demonstrate an understanding of the exploration and settlement of South Carolina. 
 
Enduring Understanding The inhabitants of the early Carolina colony included native, immigrant, and enslaved peoples. To understand how these various groups interacted to form a new and unique culture, the student will utilize the knowledge and skills set forth in the following indicators: 
 
3-2.1 Compare the culture, governance, and physical environment of the major Native American tribal groups of South Carolina, including the Cherokee, Catawba, and Yemassee.
 
3-2.2 Summarize the motives, activities, and accomplishments of the exploration of South Carolina by the Spanish, French, and English.
 
3-2.3 Describe the initial contact, cooperation, and conflict between the Native Americans and European settlers in South Carolina.
 
3-2.4 Summarize the development of the Carolina colony under the Lords Proprietors and the royal colonial government, including settlement by and trade with the people of Barbados and the influence of other immigrant groups.
 
3-2.5 Explain the role of Africans in developing the culture and economy of South Carolina, including the growth of the slave trade; slave contributions to the plantation economy; the daily lives of the enslaved people; the development of the Gullah culture; and their resistance to slavery. 
 
GRADE 4
United States Studies to 1865
 
Standard 4-1: The student will demonstrate an understanding of political, economic, and geographic reasons for the exploration of the New World.
The rewards that were reaped from the exploration of the New World far outweighed the risks that were involved. To understand the motivations for exploration and the cause-and-effect relationships between its risks and rewards, the student will utilize the knowledge and skills set forth in the following indicators:
4-1.3 Explain the political, economic, and technological factors that led to the exploration of the new world by Spain, Portugal, France, the Netherlands, and England, including the competition between nations, the expansion of international trade, and the technological advances in shipbuilding and navigation. 
 
4-1.4 Summarize the accomplishments of the Vikings and the Portuguese, Spanish, English, and French explorers, including Leif Eriksson, Columbus, Hernando de Soto, Magellan, Henry Hudson, John Cabot, and La Salle. 
 
GRADE 6
Early Cultures to 1600
 
Standard 6-4: The student will demonstrate an understanding of the changing political, social, and economic cultures in Africa and the Americas.
6-4.3 Compare the contributions and the decline of the Maya, Aztec, and Inca civilizations in Central and South America, including their forms of government and their contributions in mathematics, astronomy, and architecture. 
6-4.4 Explain the contributions, features, and rise and fall of the North American ancestors of the numerous Native American tribes, including the Adena, Hopewell, Pueblo, and Mississippian cultures. 
 

Standard 6-6
: The student will demonstrate an understanding of the impact of the Renaissance, the Reformation, and the Age of Exploration on Europe and the rest of the world.
6-6.4 Compare the economic, political, and religious incentives of the various European countries to explore and settle new lands. 
 
6-6.5 Identify the origin and destinations of the voyages of major European explorers.
 
6-6.6 Explain the effects of the exchange of plants, animals, diseases, and technology throughout Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas (known as the Columbian Exchange). 
 
GRADE 8
South Carolina:  One of the United States
 
Standard 8-1: The student will demonstrate an understanding of the settlement of South Carolina and the United States by Native Americans, Europeans, and Africans.
The human mosaic of the South Carolina colony was composed of indigenous, immigrant, and enslaved populations. To understand how these differing backgrounds melded into an entirely new and different culture, the student will utilize the knowledge and skills set forth in the following indicators: 
8-1.1 Summarize the collective and individual aspects of the Native American culture of the Eastern Woodlands tribal group, including the Catawba, Cherokee, and Yemassee.
 
8-1.2 Compare the motives, activities, and accomplishments of the exploration of South Carolina and North America by the Spanish, French, and English.
 
8-1.3 Summarize the history of English settlement in New England, the mid-Atlantic region, and the South, with an emphasis on South Carolina as an example of a distinctly southern colony.