Revolutionary War

(Georgia and South Carolina Standards listed below)


Army life during the American Revolution was hardship and suffering. Hear about this historic time from letters and diaries of the soldiers who lived it. With a visit from a soldier in Washington's Army, you will get a feel for what it was like during the birth of our nation.

Accompanying this program is a large collection of artifacts and everyday reproduction items which will allow the audience the opportunity to hold history in their hands. This award-winning program is a lesson in history you will not soon forget.
Enjoyed by all ages.

Georgia:

Grade Four:

SS4H1 Explain the causes, events, and results of the American Revolution.
a. Trace the events that shaped the revolutionary movement in America: French and Indian War, 1765 Stamp Act, the slogan “no taxation without representation,” the activities of the Sons of Liberty, the activities of the Daughters of Liberty, Boston Massacre, and the Boston Tea Party.
b. Describe the influence of key individuals and groups during the American Revolution: King George III, George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, Benedict Arnold, Patrick Henry, John Adams, Paul Revere, and Black regiments.
c. Describe the major events of the American Revolution and explain the factors leading to American victory and British defeat; include the Battles of Lexington and Concord, Saratoga, and Yorktown.
d. Explain the writing of the Declaration of Independence; include who wrote it, how it was written, why it was necessary, and how it was a response to tyranny and the abuse of power.

Grade Eight:
SS8H3 Analyze the role of Georgia in the American Revolutionary Era.
a. Explain the causes of the American Revolution as they impacted Georgia; include the French and Indian War, Proclamation of 1763, and the Stamp Act.
b. Interpret the three parts of the Declaration of Independence (preamble, grievances, and declaration) and identify the three Georgia signers of the document.
c. Analyze the significance of the Loyalists and Patriots as a part of Georgia’s role in the Revolutionary War; include the Battle of Kettle Creek and Siege of Savannah.

Grades 9 - 12:
SSUSH3 Analyze the causes of the American Revolution.
a. Explain how the French and Indian War and the 1763 Treaty of Paris laid the groundwork for the American Revolution.
b. Explain colonial response to the Proclamation of 1763, the Stamp Act, and the Intolerable Acts as seen in the Sons and Daughters of Liberty and the Committees of Correspondence.
c. Explain the importance of Thomas Paine’s Common Sense to the movement for independence.

SSUSH4 Analyze the ideological, military, social, and diplomatic aspects of the American Revolution.
a. Investigate the intellectual sources, organization, and argument of the Declaration of Independence including the role of Thomas Jefferson and the Committee of Five.
b. Explain the reason for and significance of the French alliance and other foreign assistance including the diplomacy of Benjamin Franklin and John Adams.
c. Analyze George Washington as a military leader, including but not limited to the influence of Baron von Steuben, the Marquis de LaFayette, and the significance of Valley Forge in the creation of a professional military.
d. Investigate the role of geography at the Battles of Trenton, Saratoga, and Yorktown.
e. Examine the roles of women, American Indians, and enslaved and free Blacks in supporting the war effort.
f. Explain the significance of the Treaty of Paris, 1783.


South Carolina:
GRADE 3
Standard 3-3 The student will demonstrate an understanding of the American Revolution and South Carolina’s role in the development of the new American nation.

People establish governments to provide stability and ensure the protection of their rights as citizens. To understand the causes and results of the American Revolution on South Carolina, the student will utilize the knowledge and skills set forth in the following indicators:

3-3.1 Summarize the causes of the American Revolution, including Britain’s passage of the Stamp Act, the Tea Act, and the Intolerable Acts; the rebellion of the colonists; and the writing of the Declaration of Independence.

3-3.2 Compare the perspectives of South Carolinians during the American Revolution, including Patriots, Loyalists, women, enslaved and free Africans, and Native Americans.

3-3.3 Summarize the course of the American Revolution in South Carolina, including the role of William Jasper and Fort Moultrie; the occupation of Charles Town by the British; the partisan warfare of Thomas Sumter, Andrew Pickens, and Francis Marion; and the battles of Cowpens, Kings Mountain, and Eutaw Springs.

3-3.4 Summarize the effects of the American Revolution, including the establishment of state and national governments.

GRADE 4
Standard 4-2: The student will demonstrate an understanding of how the settlement of North America was influenced by the interactions of Native Americans, Europeans, and Africans.

The interaction among peoples from three different continents created a distinctly American culture. To understand the contributions made by Native Americans, Europeans, and Africans to the settlement of North America, the student will utilize the knowledge and skills set forth in the following indicators:

4-2.4 Summarize the relationships among the Native Americans, Europeans, and Africans, including the French and Indian Wars, the slave revolts, and the conduct of trade.

Standard 4-3: The student will demonstrate an understanding of the conflict between the American colonies and England.

Revolutions result from resistance to conditions that are perceived as unfair by the people who are demanding change. The changes brought about by revolution can be both positive and negative. To understand the results of the conflict between the American colonies and England, the student will utilize the knowledge and skills set forth in the following indicators:

4-3.1 Explain the major political and economic factors leading to the American Revolution, including the French and Indian War, the Stamp Act, the Tea Act, and the Intolerable Acts as well as American resistance to these acts through boycotts, petitions, and congresses.

4-3.2 Explain the significance of major ideas and philosophies of government reflected in the Declaration of Independence.

4-3.3 Summarize the importance of the key battles of the Revolutionary War and the reasons for American victories including Lexington and Concord, Bunker (Breed’s) Hill, Charleston, Saratoga, Cowpens, and Yorktown.

4-3.4 Explain how the American Revolution affected attitudes toward and the future of slavery, women, and Native Americans.

Standard 4-4: The student will demonstrate an understanding of the beginnings of America as a nation and the establishment of the new government.

After independence was declared, Americans were faced with creating a new form of government that would embody the ideals for which they had fought. To understand the development of these United States into a new nation, the student will utilize the knowledge and skills set forth in the following indicators:

Indicators 4-4.1 Compare the ideas in the Articles of Confederation with those in the United States Constitution, including how powers are now shared between state and national government and how individuals and states are represented in Congress.

GRADE 8 
Standard 8-2: The student will demonstrate an understanding of the causes of the American Revolution and the beginnings of the new nation, with an emphasis on South Carolina’s role in the development of that nation.

The events surrounding the American Revolution transformed British colonists into American citizens. To understand South Carolina’s pivotal role in this process, the student will utilize the knowledge and skills set forth in the following indicators:

8-2.1 Explain the political and economic consequences of the French and Indian War on the relationship of the South Carolina colonists with Native Americans and England.

8-2.2 Summarize the response of South Carolina to events leading to the American Revolution, including the Stamp Act, the Tea Acts, and the Sons of Liberty.

8-2.3 Explain the roles of South Carolinians in the adoption of the Declaration of Independence.

8-2.4 Compare the perspectives of different groups of South Carolinians during the American Revolution, including Patriots, Tories/Loyalists, women, enslaved and free Africans, and Native Americans.

8-2.5 Summarize the role of South Carolinians in the course of the American Revolution, including the use of partisan warfare and the battles of Charleston, Camden, Cowpens, Kings Mountain and Eutaw Springs.

8-2.6 Explain the role of South Carolinians in the establishment of their new state government and the national government after the American Revolution.

Grades 9 - 12th 
Standard USHC-1: The student will demonstrate an understanding of the conflicts between regional and national interest in the development of democracy in the United States.

Contemporary democratic ideals originated in England, were transplanted to North America by English settlers, and have evolved in the United States as a result of regional experiences. To understand this evolution of democracy and the conflict between local and national interests, the student will utilize the knowledge and skills set forth in the following indicators:

USHC-1.1 Summarize the distinct characteristics of each colonial region in the settlement and development of British North America, including religious, social, political, and economic differences.

USHC-1.2 Analyze the early development of representative government and political rights in the American colonies, including the influence of the British political system and the rule of law as written in the Magna Carta and the English Bill of Rights, and the conflict between the colonial legislatures and the British Parliament over the right to tax that resulted in the American Revolutionary War.

USHC-1.3 Analyze the impact of the Declaration of Independence and the American Revolution on establishing the ideals of a democratic republic.